Archive for December, 2010

December 30, 2010

medina

FENNESZ / TIM HECKER, Live in Nanterre, Maison de la musique, France – 1.6.2007

Two separate live performances. First PAN SONIC were planed before they cancel and were replaced by TIM HECKER.
I love TIM HECKER in studio, but I confess that it was a little boring on stage. On the contrary, I think the sound is good enough here to listen to it almost as a new lo-fi album, even if nothing here is really surprising for who knows his beautiful ambient laptop soundscapes. He played first.
Then, FENNESZ, once more, made a brand new live performance, I’ve seen him more than 10 times and each time it’s different, and often outstanding. Here he plays guitar live and processes the sound with his laptop.

December 30, 2010

Aidan Baker :: Liminoid / Lifeforms

While Alien8 Recordings has had the pleasure of releasing three full-length albums by Aidan Baker’s ambient doom project Nadja, as well as his collaborative effort Fantasma Parastasie with Tim Hecker, this marks our first solo release with the artist.

Although we consider Liminoid/Lifeforms to be a solo effort, there are in fact no less than eight guest musicians helping out on the recording. These include Canadian noise legend Knurl (a.k.a. Alan Bloor) who has been released three times on Alien8 Recordings prior to this recording, as well as members of Arc, Picastro, Forest City Lovers and Whisper Room.

Liminoid is a composition for large ensemble exploring sonic immersion in drones and textures, rhythms and pulsations. Incorporating composed and improvised segments, the piece uses elongation of sound and layered polyphony in an attempt to create a liminal and/or numinous state. This recording of Liminoid is from its premier at The Music Gallery’s X-Avant Festival in Toronto, October 25, 2008. The piece features a powerful vocal performance with every member sharing the vocal duties. The lyrics have been adapted from 5th-8th century Coptic Christian texts and inspired by the book Ancient Christian Magic by by Marvin W. Meyer & Richard Smith.

http://www.filefactory.com/file/b1d51c2/n/Aidan_Baker_-_Liminoid_Lifeforms.rar

December 30, 2010

2001: The Making Of A Myth [2001] / DVDRip

El 2 de abril de 1968 en Washington DC, Estados Unidos, se mostró al mundo por primera vez “2001: A Space Odyssey”, la gran obra maestra de Stanley Kubrick y unos de los films más venerados en la historia del cine. En este documento exclusivo realizado por la televisión inglesa en el año 2001 e incluido en los extras del DVD ‘2001: A Space Odyssey [Two-Disc Special Edition]’ editado en el 2007, veremos al director James Cameron narrando la historia de su creación, desde los primeros bocetos del guión, basado en el cuento corto “El Centinela” de Arthur C. Clarke, pasando por las investigaciones de producción en la NASA, hasta el armado y la filmación de los gigantescos escenarios, y la fantástica post-producción que incluiría los efectos visuales y sonoros que deslumbraron al mundo. Casi tres años de inspirador trabajo se necesitaron para crear este delirante sueño evolutivo del genial director, que fue fríamente recibido por público y prensa en sus primeros meses de proyección, para luego convertirse en una película de culto, divinizada por otros artistas como Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Sidney Pollack o el propio Arthur C. Clarke, quienes aparecen en este detallado homenaje para rendir tributo a través de entrevistas e imagenes de archivo. El dossier se compone de cuatro partes: ‘The Making’, ‘The Legacy’, y los dos cortometrajes ‘Conceptual Art’ y ‘Look Kubrick’, que nos adentran en el diseño visual del film y los trabajos de fotografía de Kubrick. 2010 es el año que hacemos contacto, una vez más, con el irrepetible mundo del inmortal Stanley.
La película está alojada en un link que descarga un archivo WinRar que contiene el film y sus subtítulos correspondientes.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=XZLB59N7

December 29, 2010

Bj Nilsen & Stilluppsteypa – Space Finale


*Fantastic collaboration between two masters of immersive drone music and location recordings* This incredible ninety-minute album was originally released on cassette earlier on this year. Divided into four lengthy pieces, the album has the feel of a classic piece of analogue experimentation, populated by obliterated field recordings, vintage synth timbres, archaic, blipping tones and above all, acre after acre of sustaining, continuous sound. It’s hard to know exactly how this music came about, but if you scry long enough over these vast, smoky vistas you’ll hear shapes (of some sort) starting to emerge. It’s listed that the principal ‘instrument’ used in the making of this record was a Revox 2-channel tape machine, and the fact that the release was originally consigned to cassette means that the warm, magnetic character of the music is seen through right to the end. The classic, old-fashioned styling of the album contributes to the overwhelming ambiguity that hangs over proceedings; very few modern, digital drone records manage to achieve such an unshakable air of foggy enigma, and at its intangible best ‘Space Finale’ evokes a fantasy meeting between Delia Derbyshire and The Hafler Trio. Strictly limited copies – an absolute treasure. Boomkat

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=C6QIRO54

December 29, 2010

Clouwbeck – From Which The River Rises

Devastation is often best understood through a sideways lens, as peripheral vision and the subconscious possess observational powers beyond our ken. Poetry and parable are two art forms capable of comprehending the hidden depths of human existence, as well as “the peace that passeth understanding”; instrumental music is a third. Richard Skelton’s artistry is born of grief, yet transcends it by transcribing the ineffable.
Tragedy, injury, illness and grief – all forms of loss – can ravage or hone a human being. They can dull a vibrant life or transform a mundane one. Incident-related loss is different from the fire of the artistic temperament, because it is event-generated rather than genetically-granted. Personality does come into play in our reaction to life’s events, and many inspiring stories hail from these shores: polio-stricken presidents, paralyzed journalists, amputee mountain climbers. Those who have lost loved ones often memorialize them in honorable ways, by publishing journals and scrapbooks, penning biographies and building monuments. Yet frequently these tributes work against their stated intentions, linking the death of the loved one forever with the life.
Skelton’s grief and subsequent process of mourning have been laudably devoid of maudlin connotation and misstep. For years, fans have been watching this process unfold, first privately, then a bit more publicly. (Most of Skelton’s releases, including this one, are available only by contacting the artist.) I don’t know Richard personally (although we have corresponded), and I never knew his wife, but I would venture to say that she would be proud of the way he’s carried on. He’s honored her art by featuring her photographs on various CDs, and he’s honored their relationship by dedicating his music to her. Perhaps her death did not make him an artist, but it made him this artist, so when we hear him, we are hearing them both, in such a way that her life seems more important than her death.
Over the years, Skelton has released music in a variety of guises, including Carousell, Harlassan, Heidika and Riftmusic. Each has presented a different sonic hue and may represent different parts of Skelton’s personality. Until last year, his Box of Birch persona was likely his most well-known. But then he issued a remarkable document under his own name. By musical standards alone, Landings was a stunning achievement, but the accompanying book, replete with location names, musings and attempted comprehensions, pushed the project into the realm of the otherworldly. By simultaneously reading the journal entries and listening to the music, one could feel Skelton’s acute struggle, and visualize the thin shafts of light sifting through the trees.
Skelton’s reissued Crow Autumn (a combination of two EPs, along with new connective tissue) contained an even greater confidence, a no-longer-sublimated strength. The composer may not have found answers, but in the words of Rilke, he had come to live the questions.
What then could we expect from From Which the River Rises, the artist’s first all-new release in quite some time? Consider all that had happened since the last Clouwbeck release, Wolfrahm. The artist had, perhaps unintentionally, ‘broken through’ to the next commercial level, increasing his fan base from the hundreds to the thousands. He’d licensed his work to three different labels. He’d been approached for interviews. He’d struggled with the meaning and repercussions of minor fame. He’d changed both outwardly and inwardly. Would the new music reflect these changes?
The answer is a courageous yes. From Which the River Rises, a 33-minute album roughly divided into two long tracks, is sonically different from any of Skelton’s previous releases. The processed instrumentation remains somewhat the same: a thick mulch of orchestral layers, swirling around a tonal core. But for the first time, volume and tempo come into play. These elements make “Come the Aegir” the finest single track that Skelton has ever recorded. We’re not even four minutes in when the base volume is first surpassed, making the listener sit up and take notice, something that is totally unexpected from a Skelton production. (We’re used to saying “Ah” or “Ooh,” but never “Woah!”) Soon after this, a pulse appears – not a beat, per se, but enough to establish an audible tempo. The pulse doesn’t stay long; in fact, the track now descends further than is typical for a Skelton release, becoming nearly as quiet as the air between clouds before rising again when only four minutes remain, providing a mirror image to the track’s beginning, as if it were folded in half. Shifting bells and bows enter the fray before the proceedings come to a dramatic stop, followed by two minutes of dissolution. “Come the Aegir” is the sound of an artist transformed, claiming and exclaiming his power without timidity. If Skelton were to perform this piece live, it would be the one to inspire a standing ovation.
On “The Water’s Burden,” Skelton again experiments with the gaps between notes. The background rumbles of the second minute precede the appearance of an unprocessed piano and a dark series of bass notes. An effect that sounds like a distant automobile or airplane makes numerous passes, drawing closer each time. Seven minutes in, the composition takes a five-second pause: a long, purposeful breath before the last, slow plunge. This time, when the bass notes re-enter, they are nearly menacing in tone. “If I spent enough time by its banks,” writes Skelton in the liner notes, “could I get to know the river?” By the end of this piece, it seems as if Skelton has become the river.
For the first time in his career, Skelton has changed timbre within a guise, as this work is only marginally identifiable as that of the artist who recorded A Moraine and Wolfrahm. From Which the River Rises melds Landings’ majestic calm and Crow Autumn’s directed progression to create a synthesized whole, an integration of personalities that may well represent the second stage of Skelton’s career. In the words of Joy Harjo, This is my song. It walked forever the border of fire and water.The Silent Ballet

The Silent BalletClouwbeck – From Which The River Rises

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=P2FD5AD2

December 29, 2010

shots

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December 29, 2010

The Dead Texan

 

 

The solo entry from Adam Wiltzie — best known as one-half of Stars of the Lid — comes under the nom de rock the Dead Texan and exists as less of a song cycle than an imaginary movie score. Accompanied with a DVD of seven videos made by filmmaker Christina Vantzos only asserts this notion, but Wiltzie’s guitar-based art is equally if not better suited to stand on its own. Beautiful, slumbering compositions get peculiar titles like “The 6 Million Dollar Sandwich” and “A Chronicle of Early Failures.” If the lush, piano-flushed “La Ballade d’Alain Georges” is the finest of the instrumental tracks, Wiltzie’s two intimate vocal pieces (the organ-bolstered “Glenn’s Goo” and the ambient shoegazer-ish “The Struggle” ) are easily the disc’s highlights.

http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:j9fuxqtsldte

Link:
December 29, 2010

Portraits

http://vimeo.com/17379066

http://vimeo.com/13935257

December 29, 2010

Hooray for Harps

Don’t tell her that the harp is an underrated instrument or lacking in public appeal – Floraleda Sacchi is busy. Very busy. She’s so busy in fact that we’re having trouble catching up with her activities. Here’s a try, though:

What you’ve already missed are a ravingly-received Recital with pieces ranging from Saint-Saens to Glass (you can watch a small movie trailer with Floraleda bathing in applause), a Harp Quartet performance of Vivaldi’s four seasons (will someone please release that on CD?) and a spectacular live collaboration with Italian Electronic guru Henoel (who will be responsible for the theme song to the 2006 Olympics for the Handicapped). And just a few days ago, she once again threw all of her Classical preconceptions over board and startled the audience with a Program of traditional South American- and Irish music, as well as digging up some Janis Joplin. The good thing is that you’re in for a second chance: The Recital will be performed again (even though you’ll have to travel as far as the Emirates to listen to it) and there’s some other goodies you wouldn’t want to miss out on. Until December fifth, Sacchi and her musical partner Claudio Ferrarini will travel the USA’s West Coast as well as Canada under their “Amadeus Duo” moniker (don’t confuse them with the Guitar duo of the same name). On these nights, they will be presenting pieces dedicated specifically to the duo: A Suite by famous Italian composer and soundtrack sculptor Riccardo Joshua Moretti and three tracks by Paolo Castaldi. Moretti’s music will also be featured on Floraleda’s upcoming “Golem”-CD, which will be presented on December 13th, while the repertoire for the Amadeus Duo-disc (out on Aulia in late December) will consist of Krumpholtz’ Sonatas (Krumpholtz was an 18th Century composer hailing from France and a pretty good harpist himself). There’s also some Masterclasses and lectures in her profession as a… err Professor.

http://hotfile.com/dl/31760093/21b1d1d/Floraleda_Sacchi_Minimal_Harp.rar.html

December 29, 2010

faces

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