Archive for April, 2011

April 30, 2011

Haruka Nakamura – Twilight

Haruka Nakamura – Twilight
Released: 2010
Genre: Ambient
1. 夕べの祈り
2. Harmonie du so
3. 彼方
4. 窓辺
5. memoria
6. ベランダにて
7. faraway
8. 光景
9. dialogo
10. 音楽のある風景
11. twilight
12. カーテンコール
13. The Light
April 30, 2011

Amiina – Puzzle

Amiina regresa con un disco lleno de dulzura como ya se caracteriza y con un toque de misterio tenue, capaz de llevarse a quien sea fuera de este mundo al que Amiina ha preparado con una buena dosis de canciones nobles hasta el punto de llorar de gozo y alegria, donde ahora nos deleitan con sus voces, lo que en discos pasado no ocurria.

Continuan los sonidos minimalistas, con copas, campanillas y algunos teclados con sitetizadores. Asi mismo los violines y algunos arreglos de cuerdas extras, y un dato completamente nuevo son las percusiones.

Encontramos que tres de las canciones de este disco fueron remezcladas tomandolas del anterior EP “Re Minore” tal es el caso de Ásinn, Þristurinn y Tvisturinn. “Mambó” es ua remezcla de la cancion “Ammælis” tomada del single Seoul del anterior album Kurr.

Te invito a que redescubras a Amiina, un pedacito de Islandia, y un cuarteto de violinistas lindisimas como sus mismas canciones.

http://www.mediafire.com/?wd3l0hb7e5fijmq

April 30, 2011

Supersilent – 11 (2010)

http://www.mediafire.com/?9tw498zofpbv87t

Norway’s Supersilent is a supremely questing experimental jazz unit. Whether playing live or recording a new entry in their numbered series of albums for Rune Grammofon/ECM, they don’t rehearse or make plans. Instead, they convene and explore, following their collective muse into sound-worlds that seldom fail to seem conceptually centered, despite their spontaneous nature. And in general, I’m game to follow them wherever they go. But they lost me for a minute with Supersilent 9, which sounded like someone had fallen asleep on the keys of a Hammond organ. To be fair, the quartet had recently become a trio with the departure of drummer Jarle Vespestad, and perhaps they were adjusting to the new line-up. Happily, they’ve bounced back strong for 10 and 11. The latter is a mite uneven, collecting leftovers from the sessions for Supersilent 8 in a vinyl-only format. The former is arguably the finest and most coherent piece of music they’ve ever recorded.

After 12 years together, it seemed as if Supersilent had tried everything under the sun, from the spattering noise of their early issues to the ambient-inclined 5 to the daunting electro-acoustic jazz of 8. But on 10, they reveal a new direction that would be obvious for anyone else but is counterintuitive for them: a more acoustic, lyrical, almost traditional approach. As much as I admire their more “difficult” works, 10 is not only their most listenable record, but their bravest, clearing away the usual thickets of disturbance to let the technical skill and emotional acuity of the players shine through. The elegant interplay between Ståle Storløkken’s often-chromatic Steinway piano and Arve Henriksen’s talkative trumpet, with its inimitably airy yet ragged timbre, is front and center. As if in recognition of something special happening, producer Deathprod keeps a low profile, subtly coloring the music with quietly cosmic keyboards and hushed ambiance. The result is more similar to Henriksen’s beautiful album Cartography than anything in the Supersilent catalog, with the same cold, thin air and heart-wrenching, effortlessly modulated motifs. Minimal ambient and noise passages knit together moving set pieces like the eerie “10.3”, the pliant “10.6”, and the penetratingly wistful “10.8”.

But lest anyone think that Supersilent have gone soft, 11 opens with a long and seemingly breakbeat-inspired passage of electronic mayhem. This is one of the aforementioned disturbances they favor, and it seems a right mess when compared to the impeccable poise of 10. But if you persevere through this nerve-jangling start, you’ll be treated to a slow and expressive solo from Henriksen that carries into a more satisfying section of power electronics and fractured beats. Shades of postmodern lounge and rock music ensue, and the album manages to achieve an undeniable if broken throughline despite the disparate nature of its parts. If it feels a bit forced, it also represents the sort of challenging music for which many listeners value Supersilent. But it’s 10 that represents a new chapter for the group, without longtime collaborator Vespestad, and so it’s the ideal moment to ask: What are all these numbers adding up to? So far, the answer is a body of work that can be difficult or forthcoming, beautiful or ugly, but never anything short of fully committed. And the sequence isn’t finished yet. Supersilent 12 has already been announced, and after the re-centering maneuvers of 910, and 11, who knows where they’ll end up next.

April 29, 2011

Mountains – Air Museum

Mountains ::: Air Museum
Genre : Ambient, Electronic

Buy It!
Listen 

01 January 17
02 Thousand Square
03 Newsprint
04 Sequel
05 Blue Lanterns on East Oxford
06 Backwards Crossover
07 Live at the Triple Door

http://www.mediafire.com/?9ac5po430cv2cjp

Mountains have blown me away with every release. After thinking I would never find out anything about the band behind the brilliance of Sewn, they caught me way off guard and dropped the stunning Choral in 2009 (original authorized review deleted from Blogger, eat a dick Google) and now Air Museum takes a new approach, totally exceeding the insanely high expectations I had for it. All you need to do is take a look at my LAST.FM stats to prove I’m not fucking around with this record. Mountains have ditched the electroacoustic computer processing on Air Museum, instead opting for a more analog approach and running their usual instruments (guitar, accordions, etc) through pedals and synths and shit. So this is probably their least electronic based record but easily their most electronic sounding record. It sounds SO goddamn synthy. This is their trip to outer space. They’re not there yet, but they’re en route, soaring through the mesosphere. This is what I want to permeate every moment of my life. Every little detail on this record is pure heaven. The opening track, “January 17,” has this sound that’s so subtle, but it fucking kills me every time. For the first minute, the song is all primer, chill smoothed out organ layers paving the way for the bliss to come, and a split second before it REALLY kicks in and gets all gauzy grandeur, there’s a quick bubbly sonar blip that just floors me. It’s so perfect. Mountains bounce back and forth between straight up drone and pulsing minimal space techno, keeping a nice balance, never cemented in their textured planar earthly past but not jumping ship for the OPN New Age. They mix it SO well, the sterile jet cabin air static on “Newsprint” breathes life into silver woven blankets, preceding one of the most amazing fucking tracks EVER, “Sequel,” with its surging synth rhythm and gut-wrenchingly glorious sprays of warm golden euphoric harmonies, layers upon layers of sun drenched buzz & twinkle, humming the tune of Platonic perfection and painting everything in absolute beauty, mesmerizing & dazzling enough that Death could arrive and you wouldn’t even notice. I had pretty much put Choral on an untouchable pedestal, imagining Mountains would never be able to outdo themselves. However, instead of making another but better Choral, they made something different but every bit as fucking great. Mountains achieved what Belong didn’t. They broadsided me, again, and this time I really thought I was ready for it. Mountains are fucking IT, man. They’re prescient visionaries. I want them to do something, and they say, “Ok, but what you really want is this.” So they do what they want and in the process make the greatest fucking records of our generation.

April 26, 2011

Melodium – Coloribus [2011]

Style: Electronic, folk (folktronica)

April 26, 2011

Various Artists – For Nihon

Keith Kenniff: (AKA Goldmund, Helios)
After learning about the tragic events of the Japanese earthquake on March 11th my wife, Hollie, and I were talking about ways to help. We decided to ask a few friends to join a compilation to help raise money. A few quickly became many as we were overwhelmed and warmed by the eagerness of these musicians to get involved.

“For Nihon” features some of the premier names in ambient / experimental music. 100% of the profits from the sale of this album will be donated to the Japan Earthquake Relief Fund set up by New York’s Japan Society.”
Donate here (and view artists/tracklist)

TRY part 1
part 2
(you need to download both parts/.rar files)

Pleaseee, if you like this compilation album donate via the link above or pre-order thephysical cd here

This was THE best compilation album I have heard in a long, long time…in terms of relaxing, beautiful compilations I mean. Not gonna’ lie, it hits pretty deep. Recommended sleeptime playlist.

April 21, 2011

Xela – The Divine

XELA
The Divine
2009
Digitalis Limited
[drone, ambient, experimental]
MF (65 MB)

*50 COPIES ONLY!* On this highly limited new cassette release for Digitalis, John Twells follows up his black metal drone opus ‘The Illuminated’ with two sides of God-fearing gloom and rapturous noise-scapes. The Divine begins with that most welcoming of ecclesiastical soundtracks: the ringing of churchbells, but after a couple of minutes this cacophonous exercise in campanology seems to spiral out of control, looping and falling over itself before merging with chattering voices and dissolving into a billowing metallic din. That unearthly peal is only a taste of the devout torments yet to come however: the second side takes a more scourging approach, its searing fog-tones and suggestively oppressive churchly ambiences eventually giving way to reveal Twells’ ever-eerie falsetto. Loops begin to accumulate and a fiery, nebulous quality seems to elevate the piece to a transcendent, epiphanic conclusion. The Divine is an excellent addition to the Xela catalogue, and once again Twells explores a highly original merger of sacred music and dark ambience. Perhaps if Arvo Pärt had been composing around the time of the Inquisition he would have sounded a little like this – as church music goes this is definitely of the more fire-and-brimstone variety. Amazing music – strictly limited copies only.

April 21, 2011

William Basinski and Richard Chartier – Untitled 1-3

“Richard and I became friends after meeting at Tonic in NY when he and Taylor Deupree did a show with Carsten Nicolai. He contacted me about a possible collaboration and sent me a track which I thought was very rich and harmonically similar to something I had recently been working on, a very swampy, dark piece I was calling “The Garden of Brokenness” after a very beautiful new installation by James Elaine.
I popped it into pro tools with my piece and something really special was happening, so I spent a few weeks weeding my track, trying different things…eventually I stripped it way down and we were both quite happy with the result.
Richard came up to NY and we fine tuned it a bit together and it was done. Since the piece had changed quite a bit we decided not to use that title for this piece. He then sent me another one and again, it just worked with something else I had been working on…the second track came together very quickly, and there you have it! I love Richard’s work…very elegant, like the man!”.
(William Basinski)


Two masters of microsound together again for reissuing an appreciated collaborative work released in 2004 on Spekk label, now resumed, expanded with two new tracks and remastered by Taylor Deupree.
William and Richard decided to add “Untitled 3” and its “Reprise” to the two original pieces, keeping the early profile that marked this project.
A matter of pure minimalism here, a sound softly made that gracefully expands itself.
If you have not yet listened to “Untitled” (Spekk, 2004) it’s time to do it now, if you loved it you’ll view this update as a well-conceived integration, once again able to transmit to you its meditative atmosphere.


Limited to 1,000 copies

Tracklisting:
1 Untitled 1 (20:55)
2 Untitled 2 (35:09)
3 Untitled 3 (11:27)
4 Untitled 3 (Reprise) (5:41)

William Basinski and Richard Chartier – Untitled 1-3

April 21, 2011

Room40 10 years free compilation anniversary

DOWNLOAD NOW AVAILABLE HERE.

—–

On March 31st 2011, Room40 officially ends its tenth anniversary and to wrap things up we’re celebrating with a free 40 track sampler created by friends and family. It’s a summary of music and sound that has occupied our ears…past, present and future.

We’re very proud to offer work from as far away as Iceland and Antarctica. Pole to pole Room40 says thanks to all our supporters, friends and artists for such a great first ten years and we look forward to the next ten!

1. CHRIS ABRAHAMS – WATER
2. ASHER – UNTITLED
3. ANDREA BELFI  – POAOFBP
4. CANDLESNUFFER  – EUCLID’S FUDGE
5. JOHN CHANTLER – THE DRONING CHORD
6. RICHARD CHARTIER – RENDERED1_2009
7. CHIHEI HATAKEYAMA – FKPKC002
8. LEIGHTON CRAIG – ENDLESS BLUE SKY
9. GREG DAVIS AND BEN VIDA – TWO DOZEN WINDOWS
10. TAYLOR DEUPREE – LIVE:BRISBANE
11. DJ OLIVE – MONDAY
12. D.N.E. – VOLATILE
13. ERIKM – SOSSUSVLEI
14. BEN FROST – FEEDING
15. FRIEDL + VORFELD – BLAU
16. GLIM – FUSIBIL
17. KRAIG GRADY – BIMA
18. ERIK GRISWOLD – FROM HEAVEN ABOVE
19. DAVID GRUBBS – YOU COULD LOOK IT UP
20. GROUPER – HOLLOW TONE
21. KOEN HOLTKAMP – BROKEN CIRCLES
22. RAFAEL ANTON IRISARRI – DISTANCE
23. I8U – HIGGS
24. JEPH JERMAN – NO WORDS
25. ULRICH KRIEGER – CEPHEI
26. MINAMO + LAWRENCE ENGLISH – LUMINOUS
27. SCOTT MORRISON – BALLAD FOR VELIZY
28. PIMMON – LIMITED E COUNTRY
29. STEVE RODEN – ONE OF FORTY ROOMS
30. MARINA ROSENFELD – SWEETEST SENSATION
31. SEBASTIEN ROUX – MORE SONGS (EXCERPT)
32. PHILIP SAMARTZIS – DAVIS STATION
33. JANEK SCHAEFER – UNFOLDING HONEY
34. STEINBRÜCHEL – SAME
35. TENNISCOATS – TASMANIA: FOR A BAY
36. DAVID TOOP, SCANNER, IO3- LIVE AT OPEN FRAME
37. ZANE TROW – INITLED
38. TUJIKO NORIKO TRIO – HEARTGA LIVE
39. JAMES WEBB – PIGLET
40. XIU XIU – INGEBORG BACHMANN

DOWNLOAD NOW AVAILABLE HERE.

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April 21, 2011

BRIAN ENO